Women in science

 

TED Fellows: Read about the 12 amazing women scientists shown here!
 

Women in the news:

Keiko Torii, professor of biology at the University of Washington (UW), chief editor of The Arabidopsis Book, wins the Japanese Saruhashi prize, for a female scientist in the natural sciences for her work in the mechanism of cell–cell communication and stomatal development in plants. Read more

 

Our project:

While women are generally underrepresented in the sciences, women are well-represented in our project at all levels. Read how some of our women team members got into the field of science:


Principal Investigators: Sherry Flint-Garcia, Theresa Fulton, Sharon Mitchell

 

Postdoctoral Associates: Yinping Jiao, Ginnie Morrison, Christy Gault, Tiffany Jamann

 

Graduate students: Kelly Swarts, Anna Selby, Alessandra York, Michelle Stitzer, Shang Xue

 

Staff: Sara Miller, Anne Lorant, Lynn Johnson, Cinta Romay, Kate Guill, Susan Melia-Hancock

 

Barbara McClintock

Barbara McClintock is one of the most famous women scientists, and a pioneer in maize genetics.

 

Read more about Barbara McClintock, at Wikipedia, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Famous Scientists, or her National Library of Medicine profile.

 

Other Resources about Women in Science:

 

10 Women scientists you should follow on Twitter

Smithsonian's Ten Historic Female Scientists You Should Know

Wikipedia's Women in Science

Wired Magazine (April 2015)

 

Other important women in science: 

Mae Jemison, physician and astronaut

Grace Hopper, computer scientist and U.S. Navy admiral

Chien-Shiung Wu, experimental physicist

Marie Curie, physicist

Vera Rubin, astronomer

Rosalind Franklin, chemist

 

 

Panzea was funded by the National Science Foundation, Plant Genome Research Project, award #1238014: “The Biology of Rare Alleles in Maize and Its Wild Relatives”; the research groups on this project were also supported by the USDA-ARS, their home institutions, and/or various other sources of funding.